Question:

Should interior designer be capitalized?

3 October, 2021 William Guillemette 6

Answers (6):

  • AUTHOR: BONG MICHAUD
    14 October, 2021

    Usually, in formal writing it's common to capitalize the first letter of every word. Hence, making it Interior Designer is appropriate when communicating this information through an article or professional setting. When content are being shared on social media platforms such as Tumblr, capitalization is typically omitted in order to help reduce confusion between posts with Text Versus Image Posts. There are many variations in when and how to capitalize words when writing formally or casually. Capitalization is key when presenting technical information that needs to be presented clearly for understanding, but it may make sense not to use capitalization in more casual contexts if the reader understands what you're trying educate them about by the words used initially.

  • AUTHOR: BRANDON MOTSINGER
    14 October, 2021

    Should an interior designer be capitalized? The question is whether or not you should capitalize 'interior designer'. There are two schools of thought, one wastes precious wordcount in lower-case letters and the other uses CAPITALS. I am with the latter school of thought. When you do things like create logos, design signage for windows for sale, rebranding projects . And so on. You will find that when designing business cards they are all in uppercase letters with no spaces to make it clear how your status is different from anyone else's who might work at your company.

  • AUTHOR: NICHOLAS CENTER
    14 October, 2021

    No. An interior designer is someone who designs the interiors of buildings. Spaces inside schools, hospitals, office buildings, restaurants and other sites are often designed by an interior designer. The design usually includes decoration for the walls and furniture in the space to make it feel comfortable or welcoming. These designers typically have degrees in architecture or pre-design courses from college. Sometimes they are also called decorators because their work also involves managing elements of fashion, textiles and color choices too.

  • AUTHOR: RICHARD BYRON
    14 October, 2021

    An interior designer is a profession and should be capitalized. If you are not an interior designer, then do not capitalize. A bad accountant might be considered a profession; however, we would never refer to them as such because it's the job they do at their office. Similarly, if you're an accountant but also happen to have furniture delivered more than three times per year for your clients', then we might suggest that "Deliveries Man" or "Driver Nephew" or just plain old "Nephew" better represents your skills and interests than simply calling yourself an "Accountant." This type of skill falls more closely under the category of home decorator who specializes in movers and deliveries.

  • AUTHOR: WAYNE RAMAGE
    14 October, 2021

    Yes, it should be capitalized - interior design is not lowercase. A specific title for someone who has committed to what was first coined as "shabby chic" and has now become more commonly known as "boho glam" style. You can also call me an "interior stylist." I study color theory (the psychology of colors), furniture styles (so how many pieces of furniture will go into your space), environment styles (nature-based motifs, like the use of textures), home décor elements (bookshelves, artwork, etc.), and other design details that help you achieve a cohesive look to complement your personal aesthetic. Interior designers have a lot going on!

  • AUTHOR: WAYNE DAMRON
    14 October, 2021

    Interior designers should capitalize the word to distinguish themselves from other designers, such as web or graphics designers. In all cases, it is important to point out that design illiteracy has been plaguing our industry for over a decade and a half. Design literacy can be increased by attending Continuing Education Programs (CES) sponsored by professional organizations. Have you attended a recent CES lecture? What was your takeaway message?