Question:

How did you see your skills developing when starting out on this career path as an interior designer?

3 August, 2021 Stephen Motsinger 5

Answers (5):

  • AUTHOR: KENNETH BLOCK
    5 August, 2021

    Well, as an interior designer, I was able to set my own schedule. I would usually work in the mornings and late afternoons hours so that I could spend time with my family during the rest of the day. Working in this capacity allowed me to design custom solutions for people's homes while not having them pay over-the-top prices like you find in furniture stores. But when businesses wanted to redesign their interiors, they would ask me to project how much it would cost them and what all the materials needed were - then they would decide if it merited a complete overhaul or not.

  • AUTHOR: MICHAEL RAMAGE
    5 August, 2021

    There are many skills that go into being an interior designer. Directional sense for spacing, a strong knowledge of color schemes and their psychology,
    knowledge of furniture styles and materials -- the list goes on. Most people enter this field with formalized training with a certification or degree in architecture, design, or art conservation. In my case it was someone who really loved colors who started working as an assistant for a master decorator that would later become his mentor in the industry. What is important is that you find what suits your needs best and then take one step at time to get there - from getting bachelors degrees followed by masters programs to doing internships and apprenticeships before deciding what's best for you professionally.

  • AUTHOR: JUAN COBY
    5 August, 2021

    I first studied painting and sculpture in college. However, I soon found it too restrictive and found myself wishing for more. Out of curiosity, I signed up for a design class to see if this would suit me better and the rest is history.

    Through my schooling, I had learned about color theory with painters like Josef Albers and Mark Rothko as well as structural design or "architecture" with architects like Frank Lloyd Wright. These individual disciplines have their own amazing magical qualities that can be somewhat confusing when taken together at first glance--that is until you explore how they sometimes overlap unexpectedly through someone's artistic expression or architectural decision-making process.

  • AUTHOR: GEORGE KLEMP
    5 August, 2021

    When you first start out as an interior designer, it is challenging to determine your own design voice. It's an exciting time when you are finally unleashed from borrowing other people's designs and can create the space that you choose. However, this blank canvas does lead to questions like "what kind of design should I do?" and "do I have any skills"? After working through this initial stage, most designers find their unique style gradually emerges through simplification. The key here is to keep experimenting with different styles while listening to the clients desires. This will allow your natural talent for visual artistry and spatial understanding shine through in a stand-out way on each project, which in turn becomes benchmarks for future projects.

  • AUTHOR: BRUCE MCNAUGHT
    5 August, 2021

    I loved my job as a professional interior designer. There was never a time that I looked back, and regretted placing all of my eggs into this one basket. If anything, it has led to meaningful career growth such as completing more complex projects in my field, and developing strong connections with clients over the years.

    What pleased me most about being an interior designer is how people would value what I did for them so personally- after all just think about all the memories you have from your childhood home or teenage digs- but at the same time you know it's not actually 'your' home because its for someone else. The process always involved working closely with my client from start to finish -through conception until design completion.